Golden Flower

Autumn has arrived! Join me on a stroll around the block. Indulge in that cool, crisp air, as we spy with our little eyes the quintessential icon of autumn. When most plants begin to fade, this plant is just revving up. Delivering an aesthetically pleasing palate of colors for the harvest season.

Originally cultivated in East Asia, thousands of years ago. Today, we have about 40 different wild species and thousands of various cultivars have derived over the centuries.

Do you have anything in mind?

It’s a perennial, with the proper care. Despairingly, they’re often portrayed as a decorative seasonal prop and disregarded like it’s some sort of pathetic annual.

It’s time to surrender your final answer. What do you think?

Yep, you guessed it. You really know your plants!

It’s the Chrysanthemum, or mum for short.

We have two classifications of mums. The biggest difference being the hardiness of the plant.

Florist mums – Grown and sold in floral shops, these mums are not very hardy. They grow best in warmer climates. When planted outside, in gardens further north, they struggle to withstand the winter elements. They will ultimately fail to return the following year.

Garden mums – These are referred to as hardy mums. They produce a stolon; a horizontal stem that stays under the soil. This stolon allows the plant to come back year after year. Garden mums are typically sold at grocery stores and garden centers. Support your smaller garden centers whenever possible.

Three different techniques can be utilized to grow mums.

From Seed

Growing mums from seed can be a trip. I do not advise this if you want the best looking flower. For starters, they will need to be germinated indoors. Scatter 3 or 4 seeds on a small drainable container filled with seed-starting potting mix. Lightly cover the seeds with the mix and moisten the soil. Use a spray bottle and apply gentle sprays at first. Let them sit in a sunny area with a stable temperature around 70 degrees. In two weeks, seedlings will form and once you see a few leaves, separate the 3 plants into their own pots.

From cuttings

The second method is easier than growing chrysanthemums from seed. It should be done in late spring or early summer.

Find the stem from the top of the plant and cut off a piece, about 2 or 3 inches long. Remove any leaves from the bottom of the cut section. Dip the part of the stem you will replant, in honey. This acts as a rooting hormone and reduces fungal or bacterial growth. Place the stem in nutrient rich soil and keep moist.

From dividing

This technique uses a sharp blade to cut or split right through the plant and roots. This turns one plant into two. Plant them as normal and both plants should flourish.

Water your chrysanthemums every couple of days. There is a common misconception, since it’s not as hot in the summer, chrysanthemums don’t need to be watered as much. Au contraire, be sure to water every few days until the winter freeze sets in.

There are 13 categories of chrysanthemum.

  1. Anemone
  2. Quilled
  3. Pompon
  4. Decorative
  5. Irregular Incurve
  6. Reflex
  7. Cushion
  8. Regular Incurve
  9. Single bloom
  10. Thistle
  11. Spider
  12. Spoon
  13. Unclassified

The chrysanthemum was first cultivated as an herb thousand of years ago in China. Dried yellow and white petals are boiled in water to make tea. This tea has a multitude of abilities. It’s said to balance blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Helps one cope with stress and calm anxiety. Relieves headaches and aids in digestion. In general, chrysanthemum tea just makes people feel better. It remains very popular in Chinese tradition today.

Chrysanthemum flower petals and leaves are edible. With so many varieties, the taste also varies. Some are bitter tasting, others are sweet or tangy. Be sure to steam or boil before consumption and careful not to overcook. They can spoil quickly. A 30-second boil and letting the water cool will suffice.

The chrysanthemum looms large in many societies around the world. In China it is one of the “four gentlemen.” Each gentlemen represents a season, you can probably guess which season the chrysanthemum has, it’s the fall. Japan has a “festival of happiness” every year. This is a celebration of the flower held on September 9th.

Americans have made this a popular choice for fall cultural rituals. Mums are planted across many landscapes. They provide a pleasant fall accent and can be a sign of friendship or happiness.

We arrived back home from our jaunt around the neighborhood. The seasonal decor of gourds, cornstalks and scarecrows are such a delight. We are left with a few fun facts for our fantastic fall flowers.

They are the second most popular flower in existence, after the rose. The fall accent appeal makes them a delight in societies all over the world.

One reason these flowers become elongated or stringy is because they’re stretching for more sun. Make sure to plant them with plenty of sun to keep them happy.

Cut back stems and leaves to a few inches, before winter sets in. This will ensure they come back happy and healthy the following year.

See ya next time!

A few mums from our yard.

41 responses to “Golden Flower”

  1. I learned more about chrysanthemums after reading your entry! Thank you 💜💜💜

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You’re very welcome! I’m glad you were able to learn more about mums. 🌱😁

      Liked by 1 person

  2. The ombrè colors make them extra delightful, in my opinion.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m with you! Thanks for visiting Nova! 🌱😁

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I love chrysanthemums! I have not had much luck in keeping them alive in a pot. I think I need to start with them in the ground. I think they are so beautiful.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree, such beautiful flowers! They do very well in the ground, as long as the climate is suitable. Thanks Carrie! 🌱😁

      Like

  4. I did not know there were this ,any kinds of chrysanthemum. Very interesting,

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Elai! A plethora of pretty petals. 🌱😁

      Like

  5. Ahh… This article has brought me so much joy! It was beautifully written and your passion for plants had been infectious! I love the smell of chrysanthemums and in fact I need to inhale the fragrance right now haha! Chrysanthemum tea is one of my favourite drinks and autumn happens to be my favourite season ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much Ashley! I’m so glad to hear you share the same affinity for chrysanthemums that I do. Autumn is my favorite season too! 🙂

      Like

  6. I was just thinking this morning that I need to plant a few more mums in my yard!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. This must be a sign! hehe, thanks for sharing Jolayne 🙂

      Like

  7. Love flowers!! They look beautiful! Wish I knew how to grow them!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Linhy! I love flowers too, follow along my blog and maybe we can turn you into a green thumb in time! 🙂

      Like

    1. Thank you so much! I greatly appreciate your support. 🌱😁

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Such a useful, faithful article. I learnt alot. Making tea from yellow and white petals. Brilliant!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Sandy! I’m happy that you enjoyed the article! 🌱😁

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Beautiful flower! Very informative!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Josanne! I’m glad you enjoyed it.🌱😁

      Like

  10. chrysanthemums are so beautiful!! Thank you for sharing more information and showing some beautiful photos!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Nia! It was my pleasure 🙂

      Like

  11. Love this post! Chrysanthemums are a favorite of mine. I have never planted them the ground. Thinking I may try it since we have very mild winters were I live. Thanks for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much Ashley! I think you should give it a try, such a delight to have them in the ground and coming back year after year 🙂

      Like

  12. I love autumn flowers! This is a joy to read!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Barbara. I really appreciate the comment. Glad you enjoyed it. 🙂

      Like

  13. Love this article. Thanks for sharing very beautiful photos.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Dr. Harjit. I appreciate your kind words. It was my pleasure! 🙂

      Like

  14. I have yet to own a flower that doesn’t die within days. 🙂 This post inspired me to try again!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s great to hear Adriane! I’m so glad I’ve inspired you. I bet you will have success this time around!! 🌱😁

      Like

  15. Wow such pretty for flowers. Your love for plants really shines through in this post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much Liv. I really appreciate your kind words. 🌱😁

      Like

  16. Thank you for such a detailed post, I have some in the yard that need some love your article helps. Mums are one of my favourites…for us they are always about on Mothers Day in May…a popular gift

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It was my pleasure! Mums make an excellent gift, I totally agree. Thanks for sharing! 🙂

      Like

  17. Beautiful post and photos. Yes, it’s time for mums, I have many pots in my yard right now. They are so pretty! Happy Autumn to you!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Great information! I have had my mums for over 20 years. They completely cover my flower beds in front of my house. I have purple, yellow and orange but I have no idea what kind they are. I cut 1/3 off of every plant in May, June and July. This makes them get fuller for fall. I also make sure they are completely brown before I cut them back to the ground so the energy goes back into the plants. I had no idea they are edible. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I love that. Thank you for the additional tips. I bet your home landscape looks magnificent with all those flowers!!

      Like

  19. Very informative, I too learnt quite some interesting facts thank you. My favourite is what is called here the mikelmass daisy, it’s a fairly small variety though it grows tall in autumn green and is normally purple in colour. Lovely post.

    Like

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